Adam Hillman (@witenry) has a passion for arranging objects into amazing shapes and patterns. From LEGO bricks to staples to fried eggs, his arrangements are quite a work of art.


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Who knew cutlery could be so pretty!
CS006 kitchenware by Nendo, Tokyo, Japan.

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Minimalist Iota Playing Cards by Joe Doucet.

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Who else loves this? Bedside Table Formed From Concrete Blocks by The New Design Project.


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These balconies can actually move!

The Sharifi-ha House, designed by Nextoffice. Located in Tehran, Iran.


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Masterpiece by Diamantina & La Perla.


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Gorgeous Wooden Textile by Elisa Strozyk from Berlin, Germany.


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Who said shelves need to be boring?! Alog Modular Shelving System by Johannes Herbertsson & Jonas Nordgren from Malmo, Sweden.


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Fortify concrete chess set by Daniel Skotak.

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Gorgeously braided rose hairstyles by Alison Valsamis @braidedandblonde


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Artist makes glorious glossy geode wall decorations by Colorberry - RESIN ART.

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Inside Out Champagne Glasses by Alissia Melka-Teichroew. A beautiful modern twist on a classic!


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A masterpiece by Jan Waterston.

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Gorgeous concave bookcase by Simon Pengelly.

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How ingenious is this?! A series of creative optical illusion posters in Mumbai, India promotes the adoption of homeless animals. Photographed humans form the shapes of dogs, cats, and other animals. The campaign entitled World for All goes with the tagline “There’s always room for more. Adopt.”

Photographer: Amol Jadhav, Director: Pranav Bhide, Agency: McCann

Love.

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The talent behind these absolutely stunning creations lies in the artist called Ivenoven, who is based in Jakarta, Indonesia.

Looking at these lush succulent desserts anyone could easily mistake them for being actual terrariums.

The lush succulent terrariums are made using butter, powdered sugar, food coloring, and sometimes some additional flavoring as well, all of which give them that velvet-smooth texture.

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Aleksandra Katsan creates watercolor tattoos. She incorporates ethereal brushstrokes as well as unpredictable splatters of pigment into her body art designs.

Despite the diffused edges and lines, creating a watercolor tattoo is unlike painting with a brush. A tattooing machine is a much different tool—it uses a rigid needle—and generally requires an artist to be much more exact with their work. Katsan’s beautiful pieces showcase the skill that one must have when specializing in this style of tattoo work. Hers look convincingly like a real painting and blend technical prowess with delicate abstractions.

Katsan’s portfolio primarily features nature-inspired forms and animals. Her choice of splashes and splatters offer some creative liberties to birds, flowers, and even adorable pandas.

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